Court rejects UK woman’s lawsuit over misinterpreting “xx” code in email

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A UK woman named Karina Gasparova has lost her case against her boss after she sued him for sexual harassment for using the symbol “xx” in an email. Karina Gasparova, a project manager at essDOCS, claimed that her boss, Alexander Goulandris, had sent her an email that ended with “xx” and that she had interpreted this as a sexual advance. She also claimed that Goulandris had renamed a work file with his initials “ajg”, which she believed was an abbreviation for “A Jumbo Genital”.

The employment tribunal dismissed her claims, finding that her interpretation of the symbols was “skewed” and that there was no evidence that Goulandris had intended to make sexual advances towards her.

Here are the details of the case:

  • Karina Gasparova was a project manager at essDOCS, a UK-based IT company.
  •  Alexander Goulandris was Gasparova’s boss.
  •  In 2021, Goulandris sent Gasparova an email that ended with “xx”.
  •  Gasparova interpreted the “xx” as kisses and filed a complaint of sexual harassment against Goulandris.
  •  The employment tribunal dismissed her complaint, finding that her interpretation of the “xx” was “skewed” and that there was no evidence that Goulandris had intended to make sexual advances towards her.
  •  The tribunal also found that Gasparova had demonstrated a “tendency to make extraordinary allegations without evidence”.
  •  Gasparova was ordered to pay £5,000 in costs to essDOCS.

The case drew attention to the issue of Sexual harassment in the workplace and its importance to employees being aware of the signs of harassment. It has also highlighted the importance of being careful about the language we use in emails and other forms of communication, as it can be easily misinterpreted.

Here are some key takeaways from the case:

  • Being aware of how people interpret language differently is essential.
  •  It is essential to be careful about the language we use in emails and other forms of communication, as it can be easily misinterpreted.
  • If you believe you were sexually harassed, you must report it to your employer or the appropriate authorities.

If unsure whether something is sexual harassment, Always better to be careful and report it.

Apart from the above, here are some other things to keep in mind:

  • It is important to remember that sexual harassment is not just about physical contact. It can also include verbal, nonverbal, and electronic forms of harassment.
  • Those who have been sexually harassed should contact them; it is essential to document the harassment. This can include keeping a record of the dates, times, and details of the harassment.
  •  It is also important to tell someone about the harassment. This could be a family member, friend, co-worker, or human resources representative.
  •  If you feel comfortable doing so, consider filing a complaint with your employer or the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC).

Sexual harassment is a serious issue, and it is essential to protect yourself. By being aware of the signs of harassment and reporting it if it does occur, you can help create a safe and respectful workplace for everyone.

Here are some additional details about the case:

  • Gasparova claimed that Goulandris had also renamed a work file with his initials “ajg”, which she believed was an abbreviation for “A Jumbo Genital”.
  •  The tribunal found no evidence to support Gasparova’s claims and that she had “demonstrated a tendency to make extraordinary allegations without evidence”.
  •  The tribunal also found that Gasparova had “skewed” her interpretation of the “xx” in Goulandris’ email and that there was no evidence that he had intended to make sexual advances towards her.
  •  As a result of the tribunal’s findings, Gasparova was ordered to pay £5,000 in costs to essDOCS.

The case has been widely criticized, with some Arguments that this sets a dangerous precedent for women victims of sexual harassment. Others have argued that the case highlights the importance of being careful about the language we use in emails and other forms of communication, as it can be easily misinterpreted.

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Marta Lopez

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By Marta Lopez

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